PickyGuide.Com
 GUIDE TO GUITARS RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS

Guide to Guitars

Guitar : What is it?

Guitars

A guitar is a string instrument that uses four to 12 strings made of nylon or steel. It has a curved body resembling the number “8,” a long neck, and a fretboard. It produces a sound when plucked, tapped, or strummed. It comes in acoustic and electric types used in most musical genres including classical, rock and roll, country, blues, folk, pop, and flamenco.
 

see recommended products

Types of Guitars

GuitarsGuitars

Kinds of Guitars include the following:

Acoustic guitar

  • An acoustic guitar is made of wood.
  • It does not need any external amplifier.
  • Its resonance and shape provide its own acoustic amplification.
  • It can have built-in power and electronics for improved amplification.
  • Its subtypes include the folk, steel string, archtop, and 12-string guitar.


Baroque/Renaissance guitar

  • The Baroque/Renaissance guitar is the forerunner of the classical and modern guitar.
  • It is made of light wood.
  • It is more compact and fragile than the modern guitar.
  • It produces a quieter resonance.
  • It has four to five string courses.
  • It was originally used as an ensemble rhythmic instrument.


Classical guitar

  • The classical guitar is an acoustic guitar made up of a wooden body and nylon strings.
  • It is played while sitting down.
  • It is commonly used in classical music and polyphonic solo arrangements.
  • Its subtypes include the flamenco, guitarron, requinto, bandola, and tiple guitar.


Portuguese guitar

  • The Portuguese guitar is a type of acoustic guitar with a long neck and a shorter, rounder body.
  • It is believed to have originated from the Medieval period.
  • It is the combinations of the Arabic lute and the Medieval citar or cistre.
  • It is made up of 12 strings.
  • It is a popular instrument used in Portugal’s traditional song, the Fado.


Flat-top guitar

  • The flat-top guitar is an acoustic guitar with a reinforced yet narrow necks, and a large body.
  • It is also called the steel-string guitar.
  • Its body is usually made of rosewood or mahogany that can withstand its higher steel string tension.
  • It produces a louder sound and a brighter tone than the other acoustic guitar types.
  • It is popularly used in blues, old-time, and folk music.


Archtop guitar


  • The archtop guitar is an acoustic guitar made up of thicker, steel strings, a hollow body, and a distinctive curved top resembling the f-hole design of the violin.
  • It produces a louder volume compared to other acoustic guitars.
  • It is popular in country and jazz music.
  • It can come in an electric type that produces a unique sound ideal for rock and roll music.


Resonator guitar

  • A resonator guitar is an acoustic guitar resembling the flat-top guitar.
  • It is made up of a wooden body and steel strings.
  • It has a distinct metal resonator that amplifies its sound replacing the open sound gap, making it similar to banjo in appearance. However, the metal resonator is slowly being replaced by the electrical amplifier.
  • It can have one to three resonator cones--one on the right side and two on the left--aided by a metal spider bridge.
  • It is played using a glass or a metal slide.


12-string guitar

  • A 12-string guitar consists of six pairs of steel strings just like a mandolin.
  • Each pair is tuned one octave apart from the other or in unison.
  • It is available in both electric and acoustic types.
  • It is popularly used in rock and roll, folk, and blues music.


Russian guitar

  • A Russian guitar is an acoustic guitar with seven strings.
  • It has a wooden body.
  • It is tuned to open G major.
  • It was popular in the 19th and 20th centuries.


Acoustic bass guitar

  • An acoustic bass guitar is tuned like an electric bass guitar.
  • It has four steel strings.
  • It produces an extremely low sound resembling that of the big bass or double bass viol.


Electric guitar

  • An electric guitar requires an electric amplifier to increase its resonance.
  • It can have a hollow, solid, or semi-hollow body.
  • It is made with an electromagnetic pick-up that translates steel string vibrations into electric signals, which are transported to an external amplifier through a radio or cable device.
  • It uses different techniques done on the lower fretboard such as hammer-ons, pull-offs, tapping, volume swells, pinch harmonics, and effects pedals to produce different sounds.
  • It can have six to 12 strings.
  • It is popularly used in rock and roll, jazz, and blues music.


see recommended products

Choosing Guitars (Buying tips)

Skill level: If you are an amateur guitarist, choose an inexpensive wooden acoustic guitar to practice on. As you get better, you can move on to a high-end classical guitar or an electric guitar, depending on the music genre you want to pursue.

Body style: Look for a small, travel-size guitar  for children. A larger, jumbo to dreadnought variety is ideal for adults.

Materials used: If you are a beginner, choose an inexpensive spruce guitar. As you get better, you can move on to a rosewood guitar that produces better sound.

Sponsored Products and Services


recommended guitars

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape

 
RELATED GUIDES:
12 String Guitars
Accordions
Acoustic Guitars
Alphorns
Alto Clarinets
Alto Flutes
Alto Saxophones
Baby Grand Pianos
Bagpipes
Bagpipe Chanters
Balalaikas
Banjos
Baritone Horns
Baritone Saxophones
Bass Clarinets
Bass Drums
Bass Flutes
Bass Guitars
Bass Saxophones
Bassoons
Bodhrans
Bongos
Bouzoukis
Bugles
Button Accordions
Castanets
Celestas
Cellos
Chapman Sticks
Clarinets
Classical Guitars
Clavichords
Concertinas
Congas
Contrabass Clarinets
Contrabass Saxophones
Contrabassoons
Cornets
Cowbells
Crash Cymbals
Crumhorns
Cuatros
Cymbals
Didgeridoos
Digital Pianos
Dizis
Djembes
Double Basses
Drum Machines
Drum Sets
Dulcimers
Electric Guitars
Electric Mandolins
Electric Pianos
Electric Sitars
Electric Violins
English Horns
Erhus
Euphoniums
Flugelhorns
Flutes
French Horns
Glockenspiels
Gongs
Grand Pianos
Guiros
Hammered Dulcimers
Handbells
Harmonicas
Harmoniums
Harps
Harpsichords
Highland Bagpipes
Indian Flutes
Irish Bagpipes
Irish Bouzoukis
Kotos
Lutes
Mandocellos
Mandolas
Mandolins
Maracas
Marimbas
Mbiras
Mellophones
Mellotrons
Melodicas
Nose Flutes
Nyckelharpas
Oboes
Ocarinas
Pan Flutes
Pianos
Piccolos
Piccolo Trumpets
Rainsticks
Recorders
Samplers
Saxophones
Shakuhachis
Shawms
Shekeres
Shofars
Sitars
Snare Drums
Soprano Saxophones
Sousaphones
Steel Drums
Synthesizers
Tablas
Taiko Drums
Tambourines
Tenor Saxophones
Theremins
Timpanis
Tin Whistles
Trombones
Trumpets
Tubas
Udu Drums
Ukuleles
Upright Pianos
Vibraphones
Violas
Violins
Washboards
Xylophones
Zithers


Search for more Pickyguides: